Dallas garbage rates on the rise

DALLAS -- The high cost of fuel used to transport waste and operate power machinery at the landfill and brand new commingled recycling and yard debris bins means Dallas residents will see a 7.6-percen

DALLAS -- The high cost of fuel used to transport waste and operate power machinery at the landfill and brand new commingled recycling and yard debris bins means Dallas residents will see a 7.6-percent increase in their garbage bills beginning July 1.

The last garbage increase was in 2005, City Manager Jerry Wyatt said.

Chuck Lerwick, operations manager at Allied Waste of Dallas, said he worked with the city for about two months before deciding on the increase, which was finalized at the May 19 city council meeting.

He said as the price of oil rises, it becomes more expensive to truck waste to the landfill.

In addition, he said the landfill raised its price 6.9 percent last July because it now costs more to run its bull dozers, trash compactors and trailer tippers.

New bins will soon be pulled out onto curbs, one for recyclable materials such as cardboard, aluminum cans, office paper and plastic, and another for yard debris, which will alternate with recycling every other week.

Lerwick said the new bins is a logical step in building a cleaner and more efficient system to collect garbage and will improve recovery rates.

Residents will be able to put their yard waste in the special bin rather than having to fill their garbage can. Lerwick said Dallas citizens have been requesting this option for some time.

A 90-gallon yard debris cart can also be provided to non-trash customers for $7 a month.

The 35-gallon commingled recycling bins means residents will not have to sort recycling, but simply toss it in one bin. Lerwick said the cities of Albany and Corvallis are using these new bins, and he said there has been a 20-percent increase in recycling participation since their institution.

"We will see close to that (amount in Dallas) because it's so convenient with that cart," Lerwick said. "A lot of people are going to want to recycle."

Wyatt said the main idea is to lessen the amount of residential trash.

"If people can have their yard waste and recycling picked up every week, then they will reduce their household pickup," Wyatt said.

However, glass will not be allowed in commingled bins because Lerwick said it will contaminate the rest of the recyclable materials. Wyatt said there also isn't a good market for recycled glass yet, and residents can still recycle glass on their own at the depot on West Ellendale Avenue.

Residents should expect to see mailings from Allied Waste and a calendar with more information about which days the new bins should be put on the curb for pick up.

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