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Arlie Holt U.S. Veteran

March 18, 1930 - December 25, 2017

Arlie Holt, 87, of Dallas, died on Dec. 25, 2017. He was born (the youngest of four boys) March 18, 1930, on a stump farm near Vernonia, to Charlie and Vintie (Trotter) Holt.
His Missouri-born father, Charlie, was raised in Oregon, but was back in Kansas visiting relatives and met Vintie as their voices blended while singing side by side in the church choir. There was an extended courtship and extended Florida honeymoon in 1919, before the family came to Oregon with the two oldest Kansas-born brothers and Grandma Holt in a Studebaker in 1924. Arlie’s other brother Lewis was born in Oregon.
After the loss of the farm in the Depression, the family followed Charlie from one group logging camp to another, up and down the Columbia River until his death in a logging accident in 1939. There were 15 moves in Arlie’s first nine years, and he attended five different elementary schools in Kalama, White Salmon, Wash., and Colton, and finally Bridgeport. Vintie moved her family of four boys to their Bridgeport home on the little Luckiamute River in 1940 and said, “No More Moves,” and she lived there until her death 50 years later. She encouraged each of her sons to get college degrees.
Arlie claimed that teachers generally left him alone so he could indulge in his passions for drawing, reading and geography — and daydreaming. He graduated from the eighth grade at Bridgeport, and he attended high school in Dallas, where he graduated in 1948. He attended the University of Oregon in 1948-1953 with majors in art and history with an emphasis in European studies. He was enlisted in the Army during the Korean War and was stationed in Germany and took his leaves in London, Paris, Rome, Vienna and Munich. It was then that he developed his lifelong love for opera.
Arlie returned to Munich in 1957 for two years and attended the University of Munich with focus on theater and opera. He shared an atelier with an Italian painter — Gaetano Pompa — and often visited Rome with him.
In 1959, he returned to Bridgeport to care for his mother, who had broken her back, and he picked up a teaching credential at Oregon College of Education (Western Oregon University) in Monmouth and fell in love with teaching. While there, he became very involved in theater. He then worked at the Pentacle Theater in Salem for a number of years as both actor and director. He taught English and directed plays at Dallas High School for four years from 1962 to 1966.
He returned to the University of Oregon and did graduate work in theater.
His last 18 years of teaching were at Oregon City High School, where he headed a full-time drama program. He retired from theater in 1987 after 75 opening nights to once again care for his mother. The two experiences Arlie is most proud of in his life is the summer he took his mother to Europe in 1971, and the book of her life which they worked on together titled, “Vintie, the Missouri Waltz.”
After her death, the Bridgeport community began to encourage Arlie to do its history, but he resisted and went to Mexico instead. Upon his return, he relented, and this led to an intense interest in Polk County and Oregon history in general. He soon joined the Polk County Historical Society and became active in helping to plan the exhibits in the new museum. He was often asked to lecture for various historical and genealogical and civic groups. Among his accomplishments was the discovery of the great Collins collection, which had traveled from Oregon to Alaska, and getting it returned to Polk County. He also worked with a London television company which came to Polk County to film the segments for a documentary on the life of the Dallas-born singer Johnnie Ray. In 2003, Arlie was a recipient of an award by the Anna Maria Pittman Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution for historic preservation.
Memories of Arlie: He’s back at his house with his kitties and chickens and wood stove blazing away, opera music in the background. He’s either planning a new play at school or researching pioneers.
All who knew Arlie will remember him for his lifelong love of kitties. He is mourned by Hunk, Rita, Patches, Mommy, Rockie and Smokey.
Contributions can be made to the Polk County Historical Society Museum in his memory. A memorial service will be announced at a later date. Dallas Mortuary Tribute Center is caring for the family.
To share an online condolence, go to: www.dallastribute.com.
Holt
March 18, 1930 – Dec. 25, 2017
Arlie Holt, 87, of Dallas, died on Dec. 25, 2017. He was born (the youngest of four boys) March 18, 1930, on a stump farm near Vernonia, to Charlie and Vintie (Trotter) Holt.
His Missouri-born father, Charlie, was raised in Oregon, but was back in Kansas visiting relatives and met Vintie as their voices blended while singing side by side in the church choir. There was an extended courtship and extended Florida honeymoon in 1919, before the family came to Oregon with the two oldest Kansas-born brothers and Grandma Holt in a Studebaker in 1924. Arlie’s other brother Lewis was born in Oregon.
After the loss of the farm in the Depression, the family followed Charlie from one group logging camp to another, up and down the Columbia River until his death in a logging accident in 1939. There were 15 moves in Arlie’s first nine years, and he attended five different elementary schools in Kalama, White Salmon, Wash., and Colton, and finally Bridgeport. Vintie moved her family of four boys to their Bridgeport home on the little Luckiamute River in 1940 and said, “No More Moves,” and she lived there until her death 50 years later. She encouraged each of her sons to get college degrees.
Arlie claimed that teachers generally left him alone so he could indulge in his passions for drawing, reading and geography — and daydreaming. He graduated from the eighth grade at Bridgeport, and he attended high school in Dallas, where he graduated in 1948. He attended the University of Oregon in 1948-1953 with majors in art and history with an emphasis in European studies. He was enlisted in the Army during the Korean War and was stationed in Germany and took his leaves in London, Paris, Rome, Vienna and Munich. It was then that he developed his lifelong love for opera.
Arlie returned to Munich in 1957 for two years and attended the University of Munich with focus on theater and opera. He shared an atelier with an Italian painter — Gaetano Pompa — and often visited Rome with him.
In 1959, he returned to Bridgeport to care for his mother, who had broken her back, and he picked up a teaching credential at Oregon College of Education (Western Oregon University) in Monmouth and fell in love with teaching. While there, he became very involved in theater. He then worked at the Pentacle Theater in Salem for a number of years as both actor and director. He taught English and directed plays at Dallas High School for four years from 1962 to 1966.
He returned to the University of Oregon and did graduate work in theater.
His last 18 years of teaching were at Oregon City High School, where he headed a full-time drama program. He retired from theater in 1987 after 75 opening nights to once again care for his mother. The two experiences Arlie is most proud of in his life is the summer he took his mother to Europe in 1971, and the book of her life which they worked on together titled, “Vintie, the Missouri Waltz.”
After her death, the Bridgeport community began to encourage Arlie to do its history, but he resisted and went to Mexico instead. Upon his return, he relented, and this led to an intense interest in Polk County and Oregon history in general. He soon joined the Polk County Historical Society and became active in helping to plan the exhibits in the new museum. He was often asked to lecture for various historical and genealogical and civic groups. Among his accomplishments was the discovery of the great Collins collection, which had traveled from Oregon to Alaska, and getting it returned to Polk County. He also worked with a London television company which came to Polk County to film the segments for a documentary on the life of the Dallas-born singer Johnnie Ray. In 2003, Arlie was a recipient of an award by the Anna Maria Pittman Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution for historic preservation.
Memories of Arlie: He’s back at his house with his kitties and chickens and wood stove blazing away, opera music in the background. He’s either planning a new play at school or researching pioneers.
All who knew Arlie will remember him for his lifelong love of kitties. He is mourned by Hunk, Rita, Patches, Mommy, Rockie and Smokey.
Contributions can be made to the Polk County Historical Society Museum in his memory. A memorial service will be announced at a later date. Dallas Mortuary Tribute Center is caring for the family.
To share an online condolence, go to: www.dallastribute.com.

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